Monthly Archives: November 2013

Weight Loss Advice from 1920

1920I was amazed at some of the comparisons from the weight loss advice of the 1920's to the 2013's. And amused at some the 'proper' language....guess that's how they rolled in the 20's.

A condensed version of the 6 tips can still hold the test of time....

Weight Loss Advice from 1920: Does It Still Hold Up Today?

 

Published in the very first issue of Reader's Digest magazine, the article "How to Regulate Your Weight" is full of diet tips that are surprisingly forward-thinking—along with others that are woefully outdated. Here, key weight-loss lessons we can all re-learn.

By Lauren Gelman

old swimmersTip #1 - 1920: “Each of us has an ideal weight which is perfectly easy to attain and still easier to retain.”
2013 Update: The concept of a “set point” is scientifically valid....

Tip #2 - 1920: “Obesity is much more common than underweight, and much more dangerous as we march into middle age.”
2013 Update: The experts we interviewed noted that the first part is certainly still true today, but pointed out that some recent science calls into question the second half of this point.

Tip #3 - 1920: “The stout person must learn that he has both friends and enemies at the table. His enemies are sugar, bread, cereal, desserts, butter, cream, olive oil, bacon, cocoa, and rich sauces. Among his best friends are lean meats, unsweetened fruits and green foods.”
2013 Update: Weight-loss experts generally consider whole grain cereals, olive oil, and cocoa as friends, not enemies.

kitchenTip #4 - 1920: “Never let willful appetite or mistaken courtesy lead you to take a second helping of such starchy foods as rice, tapioca, macaroni, or potato.”
2013 Update: This seems to be advice about eating mindfully, which is a good idea no matter what the food choice
Tip #5 - 1920: “Limit your sugar to three teaspoons daily.”
2013 Update: This is very reasonable, but today most of the sugar we eat is already processed into our food. “With all the added sugars in foods that we consume on an everyday basis, there is no reason to be adding any extra sugar to any of your food or drinks

Tip #6 - 1920:  “When the [average city dweller] goes out for a tramp or a few sets of tennis, the unwonted activity is more likely to increase his appetite than his legitimate demand for food.”
2013 Update: Definitely still exercise, all of our experts insisted. Some people will eat more calories after exercise than they burned or they need, but that’s why you need to fuel yourself with foods that will keep you satisfied without spurring weight gain

 

 

 

Diets, Food, & Lifestyle Change

overweightThink of all the interesting food plans or diets you’ve been on in the last….let’s say, in the last year. Are you still able to maintain that food plan? If not, why?

It’s easy to jump on the bandwagon when someone else loses weight and you want to mimic their success with the food plan they were on.

Or you hear of a diet - for example, I just heard recently of the Inflammation Diet - and because you have some physical alignment, you convenience yourself that THAT diet will eliminate any physical woes you experience. So off you go to research it, convince yourself that you could tolerate the foods they’re suggesting, and then make a trip to the grocery store to stock up with the ‘right’ kinds of food.

Real change comes from within. NOT THE FOOD PLAN.

Don’t get me wrong the right diet-of-life can significantly make you feel better, and lose weight.

If your ultimate goal is a significant lifestyle change, like weight loss, think lifestyle change, not short-term diet.

Various popular diets can help to jump-start your weight loss, but permanent changes in your lifestyle and food choices are what work in the long run.

Dieting & Depriving Yourself

deprivedWouldn't it be wonderful to ban the word "dieting" from our vocabulary.

The word alone always implies something you go off of at a certain point rather than developing a healthy lifestyle of eating throughout your life.

People always feel they have to be good during their diet, and, often part of that thinking is that you have to give up certain foods....for the rest of your life!!

Here's the good news: making treats totally off-limits could sabotage your weight-loss goals, research from the University of Toronto suggests.

Dieting women who were deprived of chocolate for a week had more intense cravings than those without any food restrictions, and they consumed twice as much chocolate as they usually did when they were finally permitted to eat it.

The smarter strategy is to allow yourself a small portion of the treats you love. You won't feel so deprived, or obsess about what you can't have!