Author Archives: Kris

Dieting? Right Now…I Can’t…No Way!

Well we are in full swing with the Holidays again and I got to thinking how many people get into full swing with their Holiday-eating-mentality. You know, the kind of Holiday-eating-mentality where you throw caution to the wind, and don’t think about “eating right” or “dieting” until the end of the year. Or is it moreso at the beginning of the New Year?

Is that you?

Research shows over and over again that so many of us aren’t even thinking of the word DIET right now. When is the last time you’ve seen advertisement on tv (at this time of the year) with some Company touting their weight-loss services or products! You don’t.

It seems we turn off our mindful eating and all our good intentions and plunge hopelessly into mindless eating at this time of year. Let’s face it, it starts with the temptation of Halloween candy (which if you think about it is plentiful all year long but for some reason the little Fun Size candy throws our capacity to think rationally into an eating frenzy) and it last until the last drink is drunk or the last meatball eaten on January 2nd!!

It’s as if we re-engage our brains on January 2nd and think: Ugh. Gluttony. Extra pounds. Disgust. What’s-the-name-of-that-diet-again-I-have-to-start.

And the vicious cycle of emotionally beating ourselves up about how we “must be good” starting in January continues.

May I (gently) suggest there is a better way of doing this……this…eating thing, this dieting thing? That we can enjoy Thanksgiving and Christmas and New Years and NOT let our emotional eating derail us.  That way you don’t have to think about the “diet” you have to start in January.

Can I just (strongly) suggest that you can eat right, eat good, eat healthy now. You can mindfully make choices that will impact you emotionally and physically right now. That the diet you are on is the “diet” you should be on EVERY STINKIN’ DAY.

I hope this is the Holiday season where you choose to do things differently. Because it is a choice. Remind yourself – this week, this very day – how often you are mindlessly eating and start to engage your brain when it comes to food choices.

Choose to think about dieting in a different way. Choose to think about “dieting” right now, and don’t say you can’t. Because you can.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food Choices Health Choices

overeatingLove this book…”Coach Yourself Thin” by Greg Hottiner and Michael Scholtz. This particular excerpt really made sense to me, see if it does to you too.

“There is incredible power in making your own choices.

You’re free from the constraints of someone else’s idea of how you should live healthy and lose weight. This independence sweeps away the victim mentality.

It’s no longer society’s fault that you can’t find healthy food in a restaurant, your boss’s responsibility that you can’ eat healthy on the job, or your spouse’s attitude that keeps you from exercise.

What stops many people from appreciating the power to choose is that with this power comes personal responsibility for the results of those choices. Taking control of your choices and accepting responsibility for their outcomes requires shifting from an external to an internal locus of control.

 

 

excerpts from “Coach Yourself Thin”
by Greg Hottinger & Michael Scholtz

 

excerpts from great book…..”Coach Yourself Thin” by Greg Hottinger & Michael Scholtz

With an external locus of control, you tend to attribute what happens to you to things beyond your control; you blame other people, aspects of your personality or skills that you believe you cannot change, or just plain luck.

If you come up short on a project at work, you might say, “You never told me how to use that program. It’s not my fault I didn’t get my work done,” or “Dang, I can’t do this. I’m way too lazy to learn w to use that program.”

With an internal locus of control, however, you focus on what is within your control and take responsibility for your own decisions and actions.

Revisiting the workplace scenario, if you don’t meet expectations, you might say, “My skills just weren’t as sharp as they needed to be, but I’ll be ready next time,” or “I’ll come up with a better plan for managing my work time in he future.” If you set a company record for sales, you would believe that it was because of your skill as a salesperson and accept the honor graciously.

As long as you relinquish control of your choices and responsibility for the results to something or someone else, you will only succeed when the circumstances are exactly right.

When you take back your power to choose your path and accept credit for the outcomes, you give yourself the opportunity for lasting success.”

 

 

 

 

Binge Eating Disorder

 

Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is a type of eating disorder that is characterized by recurrent binge eating without the regular use of compensatory measures to counter the binge eating.

Symptoms

  • Frequent episodes of consuming very large amount of food but without behaviors to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting.
  • A feeling of being out of control during the binge eating episodes.
  • Feelings of strong shame or guilt regarding the binge eating.
  • Indications that the binge eating is out of control, such as eating when not hungry, eating to the point of discomfort, or eating alone because of shame about the behavior.

Health Consequences of Binge Eating Disorder

The health risks of BED are most commonly those associated with clinical obesity.  Some of the potential health consequences of binge eating disorder include:

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol levels
  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Musculoskeletal problems

About Binge Eating Disorder

  • The prevalence of BED is estimated to be approximately 1-5% of the general population.
  • Binge eating disorder affects women slightly more often than men–estimates indicate that about 60% of people struggling with binge eating disorder are female, 40% are male
  • People who struggle with binge eating disorder can be of normal or heavier than average weight.
  • BED is often associated with symptoms of depression.
  • People struggling with binge eating disorder often express distress, shame, and guilt over their eating behaviors.
  • People with binge eating disorder report a lower quality of life than non-binge eating disorder.

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA)
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/who-we-are

Do You Have an Anxious Brain? Feeling Depressed?

Check out interesting information at www.hendersoncounselingservices.com
under the “Depression/Anxiety” tab

Depressed?

This Is Scientific Proof That Happiness Is A Choice

The Huffington Post  |  By

 

New Year, New You? Not Again!!!!

10 Tips to Start Over for 2014

 

Resolutions seldom work, but new beginnings do

 

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Instead of making a resolution, which most of us aren’t all that great at keeping, why not look for some areas in your life where you’d like to begin anew? Here are some tools to make starting over a little easier and your new year a little more emotionally fit.

1. Starting over is not the same as recouping from a failure. It is a new beginning. This mindset is helpful because it keeps you from wasting your time being too hard on yourself.

2. Moving through life is like climbing stairs. You go up a level and then you level off. Nothing is ever a straight shot. Have some patience with yourself and with your newfound direction.

3. A new year is also a new decade and may be a new life if you approach it in the right way. Sometimes little ideas can turn into big things. Try writing that letter to the editor or, if you need to, make the choice to drink a little less alcohol.

4. Endings are not necessarily bad things. Even if the past year was your best so far, the one ahead might just leave it in the dust. This is also true if it’s been your worst year so far, and you’ve suddenly found yourself unemployed or unattached

5. Starting over may feel scary, but it’s really a cause for celebration. Think of it as exciting, and many of your anxious feelings will begin to fade. Both feel the same to the body.

6. Remember that your future is not governed by your past. No matter what has happened in your life, you can find a way to make things a little better for yourself, and hopefully for those around you as well.

7. Having to start over is different from choosing to start over. For those whose lives are still in chaos because of manmade and natural disasters, starting over is not a choice. Giving support to those in need and being able to accept it when necessary are great qualities.

8. Healthy alternatives to negative lifestyle patterns abound. Take baby steps if you don’t feel comfortable making all your changes on January 1. If you can’t stop a bad habit, start by cutting back. It’s okay to give yourself a little time to moderate or stop something that’s hurting you.

9. It’s not all about joining a gym to get fit. What about taking a dance class to get in shape and have fun at the same time? Starting over can mean chasing your dreams. We’re happiest when we’re moving toward a goal.

10. Starting over is about giving yourself a chance at real happiness. You will have to be brave and get good at learning new things, but how bad can that be? At the very worst, you will acquire the skills you need to start on the next project.

The new year is a great time to start over. Remember that once you honestly commit to the changes, you have already begun the process.

Start the New Diet Off Right

christmas platterHere we are again….another Christmas come and gone, and a post worth repeating…..

I think if I have one more cookie, I’ll turn into one of the Keebler elves!  Having said that however, let me just say I have enjoyed the Holiday season immensely and am looking forward to New Years celebrations with friends, family and…..wait for it…..food!  

If you’re like me, while you’re appreciative of all the beautiful looking tasty dishes and hard work that everyone has put into their favorite wonderful Holiday foods, you’re probably also tired of feeling bloated and slightly overwhelmed by the constant onslaught of delicious eating and ongoing temptations.

Partaking in all that wonderful food can leave you feeling a little sluggish but the upside is, this is the time of year when we typically start to feel more motivated – motivated to ‘lose weight’ and to really start to eat well.

You know how it goes. All that bargaining you do with yourself. You’ll eat right starting today, then you only have New Year’s Eve (maybe New Year’s Day) to get through and THEN you’ll start eating right or dieting at the beginning of the year.

Hey, don’t worry about it, we all do that. The ‘January 2nd’ diet is nothing new.

2013 2014What may be new to you is looking at dieting from a psychological perspective.  I encourage you to check out the weight loss classes starting in January.

You have to change the way you think about dieting before your dieting behaviors will change.

This is a perfect time to start thinking about your weight loss goals and building your skills to help you lose those first 5 pounds!

 

An After-Thanksgiving Thought

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.”
Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste, 1825

(a stuffed turkey??!)

Weight Loss Advice from 1920

1920I was amazed at some of the comparisons from the weight loss advice of the 1920′s to the 2013′s. And amused at some the ‘proper’ language….guess that’s how they rolled in the 20′s.

A condensed version of the 6 tips can still hold the test of time….

Weight Loss Advice from 1920: Does It Still Hold Up Today?

 

Published in the very first issue of Reader’s Digest magazine, the article “How to Regulate Your Weight” is full of diet tips that are surprisingly forward-thinking—along with others that are woefully outdated. Here, key weight-loss lessons we can all re-learn.

By Lauren Gelman

old swimmersTip #1 – 1920: “Each of us has an ideal weight which is perfectly easy to attain and still easier to retain.”
2013 Update: The concept of a “set point” is scientifically valid….

Tip #2 – 1920: “Obesity is much more common than underweight, and much more dangerous as we march into middle age.”
2013 Update: The experts we interviewed noted that the first part is certainly still true today, but pointed out that some recent science calls into question the second half of this point.

Tip #3 – 1920: “The stout person must learn that he has both friends and enemies at the table. His enemies are sugar, bread, cereal, desserts, butter, cream, olive oil, bacon, cocoa, and rich sauces. Among his best friends are lean meats, unsweetened fruits and green foods.”
2013 Update: Weight-loss experts generally consider whole grain cereals, olive oil, and cocoa as friends, not enemies.

kitchenTip #4 – 1920: “Never let willful appetite or mistaken courtesy lead you to take a second helping of such starchy foods as rice, tapioca, macaroni, or potato.”
2013 Update: This seems to be advice about eating mindfully, which is a good idea no matter what the food choice
Tip #5 – 1920: “Limit your sugar to three teaspoons daily.”
2013 Update: This is very reasonable, but today most of the sugar we eat is already processed into our food. “With all the added sugars in foods that we consume on an everyday basis, there is no reason to be adding any extra sugar to any of your food or drinks

Tip #6 – 1920:  “When the [average city dweller] goes out for a tramp or a few sets of tennis, the unwonted activity is more likely to increase his appetite than his legitimate demand for food.”
2013 Update: Definitely still exercise, all of our experts insisted. Some people will eat more calories after exercise than they burned or they need, but that’s why you need to fuel yourself with foods that will keep you satisfied without spurring weight gain

 

 

 

Diets, Food, & Lifestyle Change

overweightThink of all the interesting food plans or diets you’ve been on in the last….let’s say, in the last year. Are you still able to maintain that food plan? If not, why?

It’s easy to jump on the bandwagon when someone else loses weight and you want to mimic their success with the food plan they were on.

Or you hear of a diet – for example, I just heard recently of the Inflammation Diet – and because you have some physical alignment, you convenience yourself that THAT diet will eliminate any physical woes you experience. So off you go to research it, convince yourself that you could tolerate the foods they’re suggesting, and then make a trip to the grocery store to stock up with the ‘right’ kinds of food.

Real change comes from within. NOT THE FOOD PLAN.

Don’t get me wrong the right diet-of-life can significantly make you feel better, and lose weight.

If your ultimate goal is a significant lifestyle change, like weight loss, think lifestyle change, not short-term diet.

Various popular diets can help to jump-start your weight loss, but permanent changes in your lifestyle and food choices are what work in the long run.