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NEVER GO “ON” A DIET AGAIN!

 

 

Never go %22on%22 a diet again! 2Parties are over. Decorations are all down and put away. Unwanted or wrong size gifts have been returned to the stores and the Christmas goodies are all gone which means folks, the Holidays are officially over.

But for some, at least for parents, the signal of the end of the holidays are that the kids are back in school. And in honor of those poor children who had to go back last week I thought we should share in their suffering a little and have a little class time ourselves.

So with that being said class, the word we will be studying today is DIET. Isn’t that exciting? And for some of you out there, it just might be. But now for the rest of you, just saying that word probably puts you in somewhat of a panic and makes you want to gather your cookies (or whatever else you think you have to give up) close by your side so they can’t be confiscated.

But what if I told you that you never have to go on a diet again? No, I am not saying to throw all caution to the wind and just eat whatever, whenever, and all you can eat. And I am not saying to not ever set weight loss goals or strive to eat more healthy.

Then what am I saying? Well, did you notice that what I stated above was the words, on a diet? Now let’s take a moment and look at the word diet. The word diet was originally used as a noun and it just meant “the food and drink that we habitually consume.” It also had the meaning of “a way of life.”

Over time the meaning began to change to include using the word as a verb or an adjective. So much so that in todays modern world, most peoples usage of the word include, “To diet,” or “going on a diet,” with the meaning that they are going to restrict what they eat. Usually to lose weight or maybe to “get healthy.”

So with that in mind, I would like to propose a suggestion. Let’s return to the use of the word diet as a noun. And then take the same word and mix the letters up a little. Do you know what you come up with? The word we come up with is edit.

Now looking at the word edit we see that some of the descriptions that are associated with that word are as follows:

  • supervise
  • to collect, prepare, and arrange
  • revise or correct
  • expunge or eliminate
  • add

Can you see where I am going with this? Instead of being a dieter, how about becoming an editor? Or simply put — edit your diet (daily intake of food). If you take your normal daily diet and look at it as a rough draft with the mindset of an editor using the terminology above, let’s see how you could apply them to your daily intake of food.

SUPERVISE
A supervisor oversees and gives direction. As such, YOU are in charge of what you eat whether it is the groceries you buy and take home, dining at a restaurant or attending a celebration or party. You need to peruse what is before you and give yourself direction on what is a good choice.

TO COLLECT, PREPARE, AND ARRANGE
Be conscious of what you are collecting at the grocery store. You have to start with something that is workable in the first place. Unless you are a magician you aren’t going to transform that frozen pizza, cookies, potato chips, etc., into a healthy offering no matter how you prepare it. And, the same goes for something that starts out as nutritious. How many good nutritious food is ruined when you get it home and load it down with all sorts of non nutritious condiments or deep fry it.

REVISE OR CORRECT
Revise means to reconsider and change or modify. Everyone has their favorite “comfort” foods. And no one says you still can’t have them. However, what harm can it do to look at it and see if the recipe needs modifying somewhat to make it more healthy? Or, on the other hand maybe what you need is to be honest with yourself and revise what you think a true portion is. Come on, you know what I’m talking about! It can also mean to change your opinion. We need to really look at our daily diet. If we are honest with ourselves I am sure there are things in there we need to reconsider as to whether or not it is truly wholesome.

EXPUNGE OR ELIMINATE
Ohh, that sounds a little painful doesn’t it? Let’s face it, just because you can buy an item at the grocery store does not mean it is good food for you. A lot of items on the shelf today even seem to be more chemicals than actual food. So if there is something that no matter how hard you try to justify it you just know it is so bad for you, give it a burial and move on to new and better things. Your health and well being are worth it!

ADD
Now here’s the good part. Most of the time when people say diet they are really thinking about all the food they like but have to give up. The truth is that deprivation can actually fuel desire. So just like editors working on a book or whatever else it may be, they don’t just take things out but also add whatever is needed back in to make a successful product. Sometimes we can get in such a rut and eat the same meals week after week. Be adventurous and look for ways to broaden your horizons with new recipes. Try it, you just might like it!

So you see, you don’t have to be a dieter anymore, just become an editor of your diet. Mindful moderation and conscious consumption are thinking about the quality and quantity of what and how much you are putting in your body.

So, if you know that your “diet” needs some editing but you believe that it would be beneficial to have someone helping to guide you in creating a food plan that works for you please call me at (616) 516-1570 and together we will work at reaching your goals for a healthy, happier and better you!

 

A little Holiday humor!

 

Sugar, Sugar, EVERYWHERE!

sugar sugar everywhere

Well, we stepped over the first landmine (Halloween) just over a week ago. Did anybody get hurt out there? You know, as if having a bag of 150 candy bars and roughly only 45 trick or treater’s that came to your door wasn’t dangerous enough, I found it interesting to say the least that the next few days after, all the tv news shows and web articles were giving out “helpful” hints on how to use that leftover candy in a dessert. Apparently, a candy bar can’t stand on its own, you have to mix it with a cookie crust, brownies, ice cream, pudding and whipped cream to make it go away.

I guess that is one way to get rid of the extra candy— But are you really getting rid of it? You might get it off your counter but where do you think it will show up? YEP! You guessed it. Right around your waistline and clogging up your arteries!

If you did opt for this, I hope you will at least spread it out over time. Put the candy in the freezer and then pull it out and use it for special occasions and especially when you can take the dessert somewhere else where you will have lots of help eating it.

Or you could still just put it in the freezer and take one out here and there say after a walk around the block or after you bag that mountain of leaves that is in your yard right about now.

But please use some common sense when it comes to using the candy. I saw a recipe that was described as a giant chocolate chip cookie with tons of Halloween candy and lots of frosting. In the recipe itself it also called for cream cheese, marshmallow creme and caramel sauce. It was touted as a dessert that was sure to leave you in a sugar coma as if that was a good thing.

Really, why go through all the extra steps of making something like that up when you can just pop open a 5 lb. bag of sugar and pour it down your throat in one easy step? Of course I am being facetious in what I am saying but I am trying to get a point across. There is absolutely nothing redeeming nor remotely nutritious about a recipe like that. Why would we want to serve something like that to our family?

We are so accustomed to having sugar in our daily diet we don’t realize how much we are actually consuming. Naturally occurring sugar is the sugar found in whole, unprocessed foods, such as milk, fruit, vegetables, and some grains. What is unsettling is that the average American consumes around 156 pounds of added sugar per year or roughly 22 tsp. every day according to the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture). And what is even more disturbing is that people are consuming excessive sugar in the form of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup. This is a highly processed form of sugar which is cheaper yet 20 percent sweeter than regular table sugar. That’s why many food and beverage manufacturers decide to use it in their products.

The bad news is that the human body is not made to consume excessive amounts of sugar, especially in the form of fructose. Our body metabolizes fructose differently than sugar and can cause a whole host of problems that can have far reaching effects on your health, weight gain just being one of them.

You are probably thinking, “I don’t eat that much sugar.” But, if you are not in the regular habit of checking the labels on the foods you purchase, you would be surprised at how many foods contain added sugar. Over the course of a day with every thing you put in your mouth the grams of sugar you eat can really add up. Even foods such as spaghetti sauce, canned soup, and bread all contain added sugar. What is even more disheartening are the products with a healthy sounding name but with an ingredient list that is anything but healthy such as granola bars, yogurt and Green tea.

Just for kicks and giggles, the next time you go to the grocery store, take a little time and notice how many items make claims in eye catching large print such as, “More Protein,” “Made with Whole Grains,” or “Fat Free” which grabs your attention making you believe it is healthy but in reality has added ingredients such as added sugar, especially High Fructose Corn Syrup or some other form of sugar.

So, going back to that recipe I mentioned above, it really doesn’t sound like a good idea does it? I don’t like to be wasteful, but maybe all those leftover Snickers bars hanging out in your cupboard calling your name should just be given a permanent home at the local landfill instead of on your hips, just saying!

Sometimes navigating through the holidays can be quite a struggle  making wise choices. If you think you would benefit from someone holding you accountable and walking you through some new ways to think about food or help you with an exercise program to get you moving in the right direction, please call me at (616) 516-1570 or use the contact tab on the upper right hand corner of the screen and “Let’s talk!”

Taking Charge at the Beginning of the Season!

 

pumpkin-spice-7

Well, it’s time. The official season has begun. Everyone is going to be doing it you know. Some of us could hardly wait for it. Have I peaked your interest yet? Okay, I guess I can tell you now. Are you ready? We are all going undercover. Yes, I said undercover but I don’t mean as in detective work.

I’m of course talking about hoodies, sweaters, long pants, and eventually coats. Anything that covers up. Some of us are saying,“Thank Goodness!” Covers up what you might be asking? Well, how about that pumpkin muffin, donut, bread, latte, ice cream, etc., etc., that you’ve been scarfing down on a daily basis lately. Really……how many things can you put pumpkin in? Everywhere I look there’s something with pumpkin in it. I’m surprised they haven’t put it in toothpaste yet. Now, if it was just eating pumpkin there would be no problem. It’s the cream, butter, sugar, oil and flour you have to add to it to that can cause the problem.

As fall rolls around don’t you notice how your eating patterns can change. All of a sudden our minds and tastes goes in a whole new direction. It’s a seasonal thing. In April and May we are excited about the warmer weather coming and we’re thinking and looking forward to grilling out, eating fresh fruit and garden fresh veggies that are just around the corner. We’re also thinking about getting into shape so we can wear those cute shorts and bathing suits without embarrassing ourselves.

But, living in Michigan those months go way too quickly and it seems like September and October are here before we know it. And with the colder weather we start turning to the heavier and more “comfort food” dishes that we associate fall and winter with and our ovens start churning out baked goods like a factory.

So, before we get too far into the season we would be mindful to remember that just as an undercover agent eventually has to come out of the shadows and reveal his true identity, we too will one day next spring have to come out of our “undercover disguise” and reveal our true identity (figure). So that means making wise choices in the days ahead especially with the holidays (Halloween being the grand kick off) in the not to distant future.

So, I think we need a game plan to stay fit don’t you? The first step is to believe you can do it! The next thing to do is to take control and stay there. This isn’t your first rodeo so you know what your weaknesses are. Coming up with strategies to navigate the potential dietary minefields of the months ahead will help you to avoid them. Below are a few that you may find helpful.

  • Stay ahead of the game by spending a few hours at the beginning of each week stocking your kitchen with healthy foods and planning your menu for the upcoming week. That way as the week starts to get busy you won’t have to scramble at the last minute and cave into the temptation of eating what is convenient (and most of the time unhealthy)
  • Don’t slow down just because summer is over and cooler weather is here. Keep exercising. If you have been inactive, start going for a 30 minute walk at least 3 days a week. Whatever you do, don’t put it off and fall into the procrastination pit. What better time to start exercising than fall when it’s cooler weather and enjoying the beautiful colors is an extra bonus.Keep track of what you eat. It helps to keep a food journal. It will help to keep you honest and help you to pinpoint your trouble areas. A little donut hole here and a cookie there and whatever delectable you walk past and pop in your mouth mindlessly can really add up by the end of the day.
  • Give yourself some wiggle room for goodness sake. Just like we look forward to juicy watermelon in the hot summer months we should be able to enjoy the comforting foods of the seasons coming up. Denying yourself of certain foods that you love can set yourself up for giving in and bingeing on them at some point. So, if there is something that you want, just limit the amount you eat. As long as you stay within your daily calorie limit and eat an overall healthy diet, then allowing yourself a small portion of something sweet or higher in fat won’t harm your waistline. And remember, if you happen to fall off the wagon during a weak moment don’t throw your hands up in despair and give up. Just pick yourself up, wipe the whipped cream off your face and get back up on that wagon. Take hold of the reins and steer it back in the right direction!

It’s still the beginning of the season and if you focus on maintaining your weight throughout this whole season coming up you won’t have to kick off the next new year with the annual, “New Years Resolution” to drop the weight — which we all know how that ends up. If you need some extra help to stay strong and would like someone to be in your corner coaching you along the way (in a pumpkin free environment) please call me at (616) 516-1570.

 

 

New Year, New You? Not Again!!!!

10 Tips to Start Over for 2014

 

Resolutions seldom work, but new beginnings do

 

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Instead of making a resolution, which most of us aren’t all that great at keeping, why not look for some areas in your life where you’d like to begin anew? Here are some tools to make starting over a little easier and your new year a little more emotionally fit.

1. Starting over is not the same as recouping from a failure. It is a new beginning. This mindset is helpful because it keeps you from wasting your time being too hard on yourself.

2. Moving through life is like climbing stairs. You go up a level and then you level off. Nothing is ever a straight shot. Have some patience with yourself and with your newfound direction.

3. A new year is also a new decade and may be a new life if you approach it in the right way. Sometimes little ideas can turn into big things. Try writing that letter to the editor or, if you need to, make the choice to drink a little less alcohol.

4. Endings are not necessarily bad things. Even if the past year was your best so far, the one ahead might just leave it in the dust. This is also true if it’s been your worst year so far, and you’ve suddenly found yourself unemployed or unattached

5. Starting over may feel scary, but it’s really a cause for celebration. Think of it as exciting, and many of your anxious feelings will begin to fade. Both feel the same to the body.

6. Remember that your future is not governed by your past. No matter what has happened in your life, you can find a way to make things a little better for yourself, and hopefully for those around you as well.

7. Having to start over is different from choosing to start over. For those whose lives are still in chaos because of manmade and natural disasters, starting over is not a choice. Giving support to those in need and being able to accept it when necessary are great qualities.

8. Healthy alternatives to negative lifestyle patterns abound. Take baby steps if you don’t feel comfortable making all your changes on January 1. If you can’t stop a bad habit, start by cutting back. It’s okay to give yourself a little time to moderate or stop something that’s hurting you.

9. It’s not all about joining a gym to get fit. What about taking a dance class to get in shape and have fun at the same time? Starting over can mean chasing your dreams. We’re happiest when we’re moving toward a goal.

10. Starting over is about giving yourself a chance at real happiness. You will have to be brave and get good at learning new things, but how bad can that be? At the very worst, you will acquire the skills you need to start on the next project.

The new year is a great time to start over. Remember that once you honestly commit to the changes, you have already begun the process.

Weight Loss Advice from 1920

1920I was amazed at some of the comparisons from the weight loss advice of the 1920's to the 2013's. And amused at some the 'proper' language....guess that's how they rolled in the 20's.

A condensed version of the 6 tips can still hold the test of time....

Weight Loss Advice from 1920: Does It Still Hold Up Today?

 

Published in the very first issue of Reader's Digest magazine, the article "How to Regulate Your Weight" is full of diet tips that are surprisingly forward-thinking—along with others that are woefully outdated. Here, key weight-loss lessons we can all re-learn.

By Lauren Gelman

old swimmersTip #1 - 1920: “Each of us has an ideal weight which is perfectly easy to attain and still easier to retain.”
2013 Update: The concept of a “set point” is scientifically valid....

Tip #2 - 1920: “Obesity is much more common than underweight, and much more dangerous as we march into middle age.”
2013 Update: The experts we interviewed noted that the first part is certainly still true today, but pointed out that some recent science calls into question the second half of this point.

Tip #3 - 1920: “The stout person must learn that he has both friends and enemies at the table. His enemies are sugar, bread, cereal, desserts, butter, cream, olive oil, bacon, cocoa, and rich sauces. Among his best friends are lean meats, unsweetened fruits and green foods.”
2013 Update: Weight-loss experts generally consider whole grain cereals, olive oil, and cocoa as friends, not enemies.

kitchenTip #4 - 1920: “Never let willful appetite or mistaken courtesy lead you to take a second helping of such starchy foods as rice, tapioca, macaroni, or potato.”
2013 Update: This seems to be advice about eating mindfully, which is a good idea no matter what the food choice
Tip #5 - 1920: “Limit your sugar to three teaspoons daily.”
2013 Update: This is very reasonable, but today most of the sugar we eat is already processed into our food. “With all the added sugars in foods that we consume on an everyday basis, there is no reason to be adding any extra sugar to any of your food or drinks

Tip #6 - 1920:  “When the [average city dweller] goes out for a tramp or a few sets of tennis, the unwonted activity is more likely to increase his appetite than his legitimate demand for food.”
2013 Update: Definitely still exercise, all of our experts insisted. Some people will eat more calories after exercise than they burned or they need, but that’s why you need to fuel yourself with foods that will keep you satisfied without spurring weight gain

 

 

 

What can good carbs do for you?

 

Simply put, if you eat only good carbs you can avoid many of the health problems that plague millions of people around the world:

 

  • You will be healthier and fitter.
  • You will feel better and have significantly more energy.
  • You will lose most or all of your excess body fat.
  • Most importantly, you’ll be able to get more enjoyment out of your body and your life!

GoodCarbs.org

Easy Way to Earn 15% Off

Earn 15% off the October weight loss classes by:

1. "Like" Thinking Thin Lifestyle on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Thinking-Thin-Lifestyle/140137376042368

2.  Share this offer from the Facebook page on your page

One drawing for the 15% offer will be announced the week of October 28, 2013.

(Currently there is a 10% offer off the October class if you sign-up now)

Anxious about Monday?

Oh my gosh - I thought this just happened to me. So much to do, so little time and the anxiety can kick in!  Come to find out, there's a whole lot of people that feel the way I do about Sunday nights - even if you actual like (LOVE!) your job.  Good to know. I'm not alone.

The Sunday Night Blues Are Real -- Here's How To Beat Them

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted:   |  Updated: 10/13/2013 1:00 pm EDT

In theory, the 62 hours between 6 p.m. on Friday evening and 8 a.m. on Monday morning are a blissful reprieve from the stress of the workweek. But even if you manage to leave work at work, the reality is that Sundays are often dominated by that sinking feeling that the workweek is looming. (And now there's not even a new episode of Breaking Bad to look forward to).

The phenomenon is a real one -- 78 percent of respondents in a recent international Monster.com poll reported experiencing the so-called "Sunday Night Blues." And a whopping 47 percent said they get it "really bad." In the U.S., that number jumps to 59 percent.

The Sunday Night Blues are created by a combination of realizing weekend fun is coming to an end and anticipating the beginning of five days of pressure, meaning it can strike even those who like their jobs. "Work is now spread out into home life with increasing demands because of email and the ability to work remotely," says Steven Meyers, professor of psychology at Roosevelt University in Chicago, Ill. "Work has become more of a drain for many people than it was a decade or two ago. There's more to dread nowadays."

But a case of the blues doesn't have to derail your Sunday. Below are five expert-approved strategies for beating that end-of-weekend anxiety.

Relax and distract.
fall play
Sometimes the best way to solve a problem is to forget about it. "Feelings of anxiety and depression are most common when the person is not particularly busy," Meyers says. "So enjoyable activities that redirect your attention are especially important. Spending time with others, doing things that you find fun, exercising [and] devoting time to hobbies are all good ways to keep busy so that dread doesn't creep into your mind."

Identify the times you tend to feel anxious as the weekend wears on (Sunday Night Blues can be a misnomer -- sometimes it starts Sunday morning or afternoon), and purposely plan something to keep your mind focused on something else during those times.

Put your feelings on paper.
journal
Still can't squelch the feeling of impending doom on Monday Morning Eve? Try writing down exactly what it is that's bothering you. "It's a catharsis to get it out on paper ... It's like flushing a toilet: You get it out on paper and you have flushed your system out," says James Campbell Quick, professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at The University of Texas at Arlington. "Plus, when you go back and look at it you may realize that some of what you're thinking and feeling is a little off reality."

Listing out exactly what's bothering allows you to "weigh the evidence and examine the facts that are underneath the feelings," Meyers says. He recommends also writing down plans to address each of the stressful situations, because this can help "people reappraise the scope and scale of the stresses that they're looking at over the next several days."

Unplug.
off switch
In a world of 24/7 connectivity, there's almost always an option to check in at work -- and that means nine-to-five, five-days-a-week jobs are often a relic of the past. It can be easy to allow the stresses of workweek to seep into your precious time off and tempting to use Sunday as a chance to get a jumpstart on the week. But, as much as you can, it's important to spend time unplugged, even if you can only manage a few hours.

Disconnecting on the weekends can allow you the time you need to recharge your batteries after a stressful week, says Joanie Ruge, senior vice president at the career site Monster.com, which conducted the Sunday Night Blues survey. It might seem counterintuitive, but taking some time off will allow you to be even more productive when you get back to the grind.

Schedule something to look forward to.
dancing with the stars
"We shouldn't save all of our fun times for the weekend," Meyers says. Strategically setting up little things to look forward to throughout the upcoming week, and even the following weekend, can help to soothe some of your Sunday-evening dread.

These activities don't need to be elaborate (think: watching a TV show, making a phone date with a friend or going out to dinner). "Any of these are small enough to be feasible for workweek activities but large enough to make you feel excited or hopeful," Meyers says. Yup, DVR-ing DWTS totally counts.

Set yourself up for success.
organized desk
Sometimes Sunday night is too late to think about the Sunday Night Blues. Next week, try setting aside some time on Friday afternoon to prepare for Monday, getting things organized so you have less to feel stressed about over the weekend. "Take some time to plan, even if that means you don't dash for the door at 5 p.m. on a Friday," Ruge says. "It actually will help you have a much better and more enjoyable weekend."

10% Off – Sign Up for Fall Weight Loss Classes

10 offWe are offering 10% off the Fall Weight Loss Program classes that start on

  • Monday, October 28th 7:00 pm
  • Tuesday, October 29th 9:00 am
  • Saturday, November 9th 9:30 am

Please be aware that class sizes are limited.

Orientation meeting should be attended first to see if you are a good candidate for this 4- week program.  Free Orientation meetings are next week - hope to see you then. Call 616-608-5449 to register for the following:

Monday, October 21st, 7:00-7:45 pm
Tuesday, October 22nd, 9:00-7:45 am
Saturday, October 26th, 9:30-10:15 am