Weight Loss

Obesity is a Disease?

overweightThis past summer the American Medical Association has officially recognized obesity as a disease, a move that could induce physicians to pay more attention to the condition and spur more insurers to pay for treatments.

"Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately one in three Americans," Dr. Patric Harris, a member of the association's board, said in a statement. She suggested the new definition would help in the fight against Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, which are linked to obesity.

One could argue for or against calling obesity a disease. The reality is, we are an obese and overweight society.  And the truth of the matter is childhood obesity is at an all time high:

  • Approximately 17% (or 12.5 million) of children and adolescents aged 2—19 years are obese.
  • Since 1980, obesity prevalence among children and adolescents has almost tripled.

Ouch! Things have got to change - obviously.  Thinking about weight loss is so much more than just what diet you're going to try. A lifestyle change is re-evaluating your level of movement, your food intake, your self-talk, and your physical and emotional health.

Being overweight or obese is costly.

Vitamin D & Weight Loss? Hmmm

Happy September Everyone!  Insert "heavy sigh" right here - that's my usual attitude about September. Sorry, it just is. Shorter days. Colder weather. Less sun. Oh boy.

Ran into this article - another great reminder about maintaining (or getting started) with a vitamin regiment.

"Researchers at the University of Minnesota found that Vitamin D levels in the body at the start of a low-calorie diet predict weight loss success, suggesting a possible role for vitamin D in weight loss."

Got your attention?  Read on....

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/161618.php

 

 

 

Weight Loss After 40 – Why It’s So Hard and What Works

Hello Readers - I ran across this article by Melanie Haiken and thought it was great. I know it's long, but it's a must-read......

 

 

A 10-step plan to win the battle of the bulge

By , Caring.com senior editor
Last updated: July 29, 2013
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Every year, it seems, the needle on the scale is a little harder to budge. You cut back on portion size; you say, "No, thank you," to dessert; you sign up for a Zumba class -- and yet your jeans size goes up and your energy level goes down. What's going on?

Starting in our early 40s, our bodies go through a series of changes that profoundly affect digestion, metabolism, and other bodily functions. Thanks to hormonal and other changes, the very growth rate of our cells slows down. It's just something we have to learn to work around.

Sometimes, though, something's gotten off track, metabolically speaking, and there's an underlying medical issue that needs to be dealt with before the usual weight-loss measures will have any effect. Here's a 10-step plan for understanding the challenges that prevent weight loss over 40, and for learning how to overcome them.

1. Get to know your body's new biological rhythms -- and adjust to them.

In long-ago times, older didn't necessarily mean plumper. Think of those icons of the American prairie, the sinewy pitchfork-wielding farm couple pictured in American Gothic. But today, those of us over 40 face a twofold challenge: We're living longer, and we're no longer out there milking the cows at 5 a.m.

When it comes to burning calories, it's a fairly simple equation. What goes in must be burned off, or it sticks to our ribs. Acquiring weight is absurdly easy -- eating just 100 extra calories a day (100 more than what your body burns) will lead to a 9- to 10-pound weight gain over the course of a year, experts say. How much is 100 calories? Not a lot: A can of Coke contains 155 calories, a chocolate bar more than 200. Of course, that cola or chocolate chip cookie is no problem if we're walking or running it off. But after 40, our activity level tends to decline, too. So the challenge is to bring the two into balance.

Look back over the past year, and think about when your weight seemed to be holding steady and when it seemed to be trending slowly upward. What were you doing during the good weeks? What sabotaged you the other times? Make a list of what works for you, and what throws you off. Your own healthy habits in the past are the ones most likely to work for you now.

2. Eliminate underlying metabolic conditions.

Would it surprise you to know that thyroid problems strike as many as 1 out of 5 adults over age 40? And 8 out of 10 of those adults are women? The most common of these is hypothyroidism -- an underactive thyroid -- and it's one of the primary reasons many women over 40 can't lose weight. The thyroid is a tiny gland that produces hormones that regulate metabolism, and when it's underactive, so is everything else. Think of low thyroid as having your internal thermostat set too low. Symptoms include feeling cold all the time, poor circulation in the hands and feet, clammy hands, tiredness and lethargy, hair loss (including eyebrows and eyelashes), and weight gain -- despite real attempts to exercise and eat well.

If you suspect an underactive thyroid may be slowing your metabolism, the first step is to call the doctor and ask for a thyroid test. But beware: It's not always that simple. Many thyroid experts consider the first-line thyroid blood test, known as the TSH, an unreliable indicator, and they argue that doctors should diagnose according to symptoms rather than a lab number. And there is extensive disagreement among endocrinologists about what should be considered a "normal" range for the TSH, what range indicates subclinical hypothyroidism, and what number indicates full-blown hypothyroidism. Since 2003, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) has been recommending that a TSH test result of 2.5 or above should be considered a possible indicator of hypothyroidism. But many laboratories still use an older standard, according to which 5.5 is the cutoff above which TSH is considered abnormal. And new recommendations issued jointly by a task force of the AACE and the American Thyroid Association (ATA) didn't clarify things much; they basically say that a thyroid result of between 2.5 and 10 could indicate hypothyroidism on a case-by-case basis. In addition, the 2012 recommendations suggest that doctors use an additional test for elevated thyroid peroxidase antibody, or TPOAb, when diagnosing autoimmune hypothyroidism.

The takeaway: If your TSH result is above 2.5, make sure your doctor knows that the AACE considers you a candidate for thyroid medication, based on your symptoms. Then ask for a referral to an endocrinologist, with whom you can discuss the need for additional testing.

3. Adjust your eating habits for maximum energy.

Your goal at this stage in your life is to keep yourself feeling full without succumbing to the temptation to eat like you could at age 20. One strategy recommended by internist Julie Taw, MD, of Englewood, New Jersey, is to eat more frequently but to consume less at each sitting. An added benefit of eating this way is that it's easier to keep your blood sugar steady, so you don't have the peaks and valleys that contribute to fatigue.

Here's the rule: Try eating five to six small meals a day, and don't go more than three or four hours without eating. For example, you might eat a light but healthy breakfast before you leave for work, then have a nonfat yogurt in the late morning. Then instead of eating a big pasta lunch and spending the afternoon in a stupor, eat a light lunch and spend the rest of your lunch break taking a brisk walk. An afternoon snack of nuts and an apple keeps you from needing the 4 p.m. sweet treat and makes it easier to avoid overeating at dinner.

Your goal is the opposite of the starvation approach to dieting -- you want to trick your body into feeling satisfied and well-fed at all times, though the total amount you're eating is less.

4. Time your eating to take advantage of your body's natural rhythms.

Most experts agree on one thing: Snack (or eat dinner) after 8 p.m., and whatever you eat is more likely to go straight to your hips and stomach. Happily, the opposite is also true -- what you eat in the mornings, when your metabolism is revved up to its optimum operating speed, is much more likely to be expended efficiently.

Don't like to eat breakfast? Sorry, but there's no way around this one; eating a good breakfast is one of the key habits experts have identified that keeps thin people thin. When members of the National Weight Control Registry (people who have maintained a weight loss of 30 pounds for between one and six years) were surveyed, 78 percent reported eating breakfast every day and almost 90 percent reported eating breakfast at least five days a week. This was one of the only factors researchers identified that those in the registry had in common!

5. Trick your metabolism with fat-fighting foods.

I know you've heard it before, but it's true: It's really not just about how much you eat, but how much of which foods. There are plenty of healthy foods you can eat all you want of -- and no, that doesn't mean stuffing your fridge with celery sticks, 1970s-style. Instead, make a few simple tweaks to your diet, incorporating foods that actually fight fat instead of those that trigger it. Then eat other foods in moderation, and you should be OK.

6. Make muscles an ally in your weight-loss campaign.

There's one thing the exercise gurus have gotten right: The more muscle mass you have, the more effectively your metabolism burns calories. But sad to say, a natural tendency of aging is to lose muscle, gradually replacing it with fat. So in order to enlist the calorie-burning abilities of muscle, we do have to work at it.

The key here to long-term benefit is basic strength training. Buy some hand weights, a bar, and some stretch bands, and channel your high school gym teacher. And don't ignore your core; planks, curls, and Pilates moves help strengthen the deep core muscles that are key to posture. Make it as pleasant as possible; work out while you watch the evening news or your favorite sit-com. Other tools that help: kettlebells, an exercise ball, and ankle weights. Slowly and gradually build up those biceps, abs, deltoids, and glutes, and you'll have some key allies in your fight to prevent age-related weight gain.

7. Get more sleep to burn more calories.

As any perimenopausal woman or hardworking man over 35 can tell you, sleep gets ever more elusive as you age. It's not just that we're busier and more stressed. We also have multiple physical issues, from back pain to snoring to night sweats, any of which can interfere with getting a good night's sleep.

Yet, paradoxically, getting a good night's sleep is one of the keys to losing weight. In recent years, significant research has shown that lack of sleep is directly connected to weight gain because of the actions of two hormones, leptin and ghrelin, that control hunger and satiety, or feeling full. One key study concluded, "Sleep duration may be an important regulator of body weight and metabolism." Here's how it works: When you're sleep deprived, ghrelin levels increase at the same time that leptin levels decrease. The result is more craving, less feeling full. Add to that the fact that sleep-deprived people often crave "energy" foods, which tend to be sweet or salty, and you can see how small changes in your routine can add up to big weight gain.

And there's more. Recently, studies have shown that our bodies are most metabolically active while we sleep, and that sleeping less than six hours impairs glucose tolerance, a key precursor to diabetes. So the longer we sleep, the more efficiently our inner fat-burning and sugar-processing engines function.

Add these all together and you can see a pattern emerging: The older we are, the harder it is to get a good night's sleep -- and the less we sleep, the more likely it is we'll gain weight. What to do? Take steps to combat sleep problems and your waistline will benefit, too.

8. Strike up a healthy relationship with your sweet tooth.

If you're dying for a sweet treat, give it to yourself, savoring it slowly so it registers fully with your brain's pleasure sensors. A trick that many experts recommend: Cut the treat in half before you start eating, carefully wrapping the second half up to "save for later." You may or may not want it -- sometimes if you eat the first half slowly and consciously enough, you'll feel satisfied. But knowing it's there if you do plays a nice trick on your brain, which tends to crave things it perceives as being in short supply.

Also, don't try to substitute artificially flavored sweets. Researchers have recently discovered that artificial sweeteners fail to trigger the body's natural satisfaction response. So eating that 100-calorie artificially sweetened cookie only adds to your problems; you'll keep on wanting the real cookie, so the 100 calories you just ate were in vain.

9. Forget dieting. Instead, focus on your fuel-to-energy ratio.

If, like most 40-somethings, you're packing some extra pounds, you've probably made plenty of resolutions to go on a diet. You've also probably figured out by this point in your life that diets rarely work, and neither does suddenly embarking on a strenuous new exercise regimen. There's a good reason that sudden, drastic changes don't lead to long-term weight loss, and may even lead to a rebound. Have you noticed that your weight tends to stay fairly constant week to week, even if one day you go on a junk food binge and the next day you're fairly good? Nature designed us with optimum abilities to maintain a steady metabolic rate, because it helps us weather food shortages and sudden demands on our energies.

Unfortunately, this means that when you've gradually gained weight over time, your body has adapted to the new weight and now does its best to hold onto it. So here's what you do: You make slow, gradual adjustments to each end of the equation. And you -- and only you -- decide which end of the fuel-in, energy-out equation to emphasize and when.

10. Make slow, realistic changes in tune with your lifestyle.

Let's say you want to lose 10 pounds. To do so right now, you'd have to burn 35,000 calories -- an overwhelming number that would require you to eat nothing at all for about 2 weeks, or jog for 51 hours, or walk for 126 hours. Not only would it be impossible, but attempts like those would send your body into starvation-mode metabolic slowdown, sabotaging your efforts.

But you could also, much more effectively, set out to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week for the next 5 to 10 weeks. Studies show that if you take the slow-but-steady approach, you're much more likely to keep that 10 pounds off. Remind yourself that you are the only one in charge of tuning up your metabolic engine. Decide whether to focus on cutting down the number of calories you're consuming, or on upping the number you're burning. Most likely, you'll strike a balance between the two that suits you.

If six half-hour walks a week is relatively painless for you, that's a good choice; if you can only manage three, do that. If going outdoors in ten-degree weather is singularly unappealing and you wouldn't be caught dead in a gym but it's not too hard to give up dessert, then prioritize dietary changes instead.

Your primary goal should be making small, gradual lifestyle changes that you can incorporate into your daily routine and stick with over time. That's the ultimate secret to combating over-40 weight gain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quick Diet Trick…

Hey, how's your New Year's Goal going?  Typically we always think of a New Year's Resolution that has to do with our health - and actually, they say that is exactly what the majority of people do.  And typically, by Feb 1st their new health goals were just a memory.

I'm still hanging in there with mine, and doing pretty good if I do say so myself!! And yes, one of my New Year's Goals had to do with living a healthier lifestyle.  So today I'm bringing you a quick diet trick that I read recently in Winter 2012 Prevention magazine.

Change your thinking and you'll change your behavior. Hope you enjoy the following...

THINK ABSTRACTLY:  When debating whether or not to indulge in that chocolate croissant, try envisioning the flaky pastry as a negative concept rather than a delicious treat.

Ohio State University researchers have found that associating foods with abstract ideas (identifying an apple as "longevity" and a candy bar as "energy crash," for example) helps people resist temptation and opt for healthier choices.

 

 

 

 

2013 Change

Here we are again....deciding what new things we want to accomplish, and a lot of times the things we want to accomplish have to do with our diet.

One of the ideas I want to encourage you to do is to change how you look at the word "DIET" - start to think of it as not something you go on and off, but as a lifestyle change. And commit to figuring out how to change your current 'diet' to a healthier eating lifestyle, so there's no more thinking of ".....I blew it, I'll start over tomorrow...." STOP THAT THINKING.  It doesn't work - never has, never will.

Change is hard. And it's easy to get discourage when you try and don't get the results you were hoping for. But the reality is that just making the effort is, in fact, progress.

Change is not an event with an exact start and stop point: it's a process.

Each step you  make, even if it's a relatively small step such as making the resolution to change, is still a step in the right direction, bringing you closer to your ultimate goal.

It's also important to recognize that even if you take a few steps back, it's not the end of the world. If viewed and used correctly, the missteps can serve as learning opportunities, helping you become better prepared for the next log of the trip!

So here's to CHANGE and hoping you will have a new year full of new thinking for a healthier YOU.

 

 

Do You Have an Addiction to Food? 5 Food Addiction Symptoms

I have always enjoyed SHAPE magazine and recently found this on-line. The article is written by Jennipher Walters and describes what symptoms to look for if you're wondering if you could be addicted to food/eating!!

I often say that in college I was addicted to Pop Tarts. In graduate school, it was candy corn. These days, thankfully, I'm more drawn to more nutritious foods, but I can't tell you the number of times I've heard others say that they're addicted to chocolate, or chips or fast food. While we usually all say these things in jest, the more research that is done on the brain's reaction to some foods, the more food addiction isn't just a joke — it's a reality.

The latest study to come out Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry found that a chocolate milkshake may affect the brain in the same way that cocaine might. Cocaine! Researchers are finding that high-sugarand high-fat foods, in a way, hijack the brain into not just craving but needing certain kinds of food. So how do you know if you are truly addicted to food? Or if you just really like and crave something? Below are five symptoms that may indicate an addiction to food.

5 Food Addiction Symptoms

1. Food is all you think about. If thinking about eating — or worrying about what you just ate — is getting in the way of your ability to go to work, be social or be a good family member, you may have a problem.

2. You want to stop — but you can't. If you feel like your love of food is out of control or if you want to stop eating so much but can't stop, it may be a sign that you need professional help.

3. You eat in secret or lie about what you've eaten. One characteristic of most people who are addicted to food is that they hide their eating behaviors or lie about what they've consumed. Feelings of guilt and shame when it comes to eating is another sign of disordered eating.

4. You eat beyond the point of fullness. Eating too much on Thanksgiving or your birthday is one thing, but regularly binging is another. If you regularly eat so much that you feel sick or can't stop eating even though you're full, you might be addicted to food. If you use laxatives or purge after binging, it's especially important to seek professional help.

5. You are compelled to eat when you're not hungry or are feeling low. While we all eat out of emotion every now and again, if you find yourself always going for high-fat and high-sugar foods when you're lonely, bored, stressed, anxious or depressed, this can signal food addiction, as your body is using some of the chemicals in those foods to boost levels in the brain.

Jennipher Walters is a certified personal trainer, lifestyle and weight management coach and group exercise instructor, and holds an MA in health journalism.

Are You Addicted to Food?

So many people have seriously - and half kidding - have asked me if food can be addicting. And my answer is always a resounding YES! I know this is just a little over 7 minutes but when you're wondering about how/where cravings begin, and how (food) addiction keeps you from losing weight, then you need to view this video. Our THINKING (in fighting the battle of the muffin top) is critical but the pathology of addiction is something that needs to be understood too - and I think this video does a nice job of it!

Eating 3 Meals a Day?

The research linking weight and meal frequency is fuzzy. A recent study suggests that it's not the number of meals you eat that matters, but the total number of calories consumed. While both the overweight and normal-weight participants reported eating three meals a day, the thinner ones ate fewer calories even though they reported eating one more snack a day.

"Eating the right foods at the right time helps keep your blood sugar steady, but eating frequently is not a ticket to overeat," says Sari Greaves, R.D., nutrition director at the Step Ahead Wellness Center in Bedminster, N.J.

Here's the latest evidence for different meal plans:

  • Three Meals. It's the magic number, according to a January 2011 review that found that eating one or two meals a day left people hungrier than eating three meals a day, even when they consumed the same number of calories.
  • Eating Less. Another study of 15 middle-aged adults compared eating three meals a day with just one large dinner. The breakfast, lunch, and dinner diet was linked to lower blood pressure, lower total and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels, and feeling fuller. But those who ate just one meal a day had higher HDL (good) cholesterol and better glucose levels. Researchers said there are benefits to fewer meals, but the key is to cut your overall calories.
  • Six Meals. Eating six meals a day on a regular schedule has been associated with lower overall calorie intake, and lower total and LDL cholesterol compared with an irregular meal plan of three to nine meals a day, according to British researchers.
  • Bottom Line. If you're watching your waistline, research suggests that eating three meals a day, with a healthy snack thrown in, will curb hunger pangs. If you opt for smaller, more frequent meals (about 300 to 4-- calories each), stick with those that are nutrient-dense, like lean meats, low-fat dairy, and produce. You can use a notebook as a food diary to keep tract of your calories.

If you don't have much of an appetite, focus on larger meals that contain high-quality protein like egg whites, healthy fat like almond or peanut butter, and lower carbohydrates, such as Greek yogurt, to remain full longer.

Going Up? Take the Stairs

Take the stairs--and save time?

It's true, according to a recent study. Researchers timed four Canadian hospital workers as they took the stairs or an elevator to their designated floor. Using the stairs took just over 13 seconds per floor, on average, while the elevator took around 36 to 38 seconds (including the time spent waiting for it to arrive). Saving time is in addition to the obvious advantage of taking the stairs, which is that they help you get more exercise.  (Consumer Reports on Health, April 2012)

If you've ever pushed the button for the elevator and waited, and waited (and pushed the button again), how many times have you muttered "it would be faster to take the stairs?"  Well, next time, take the stairs!!

Tips for Successful Slumber

A little over a year ago I was diagnosed with a thyroid issue, and up until that point I had many health problems that were plaguing me and they really took a toll on me.  In the midst of trying to get my health more balanced, one piece of advice I took from my doctor was the value of getting a good nights rest.

I don't think, up until that point, I ever really thought of 'quality sleep' one way or another, nor how valuable sleep/rest is for your body (and brain).  I now know that when I get the right amount of sleep, it is amazing how different I feel, and I encourage you NOT to wait until a health problem rears its ugly head before you take action.

In the meantime, here are some helpful tips from Consumer Reports on Health (April 2012 edition):

Even if the cause of your sleeplessness is properly treated, poor sleep habits might need to be managed separately. These techniques can help.

*Set a bedtime and wake-up time. A schedule teaches your body to expect sleep at a certain time each night.

*Curb napping. A 30-minute snooze before 3 p.m. can help make up for lost sleep, but later naps could hinder sleep at night.

*Limit alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. Refrain from smoking 2 hours before bedtime. Eliminate caffeine at least 6 hours before then, and avoid alcohol 4 to 6 hours before going to bed.

*Avoid large, late meals. They can cause sleep-disturbing indigestion, But a bedtime snack consisting of a carbohydrate and a protein - such as peanut butter on toast or cheese and crackers - can help induce drowsiness.

*Establish a soothing bedtime routine. A warm bath, reading, or listening to mellow music will help you wind down.

*Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and quiet. Try a sleeping mask or heavy curtains to shut out light. Use earplugs, a fan, or a sound machine to block noise. Consider replacing an old mattress.

*Turn off the technology. In a 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation, 95 percent of the participants said they watched television or used a computer or other electronics in the hour before going to bed. But light-emitting screens discourage sleep.

*Use your bed only for sex and sleep, which will train you to associate it with just those two things. If you don't doze off within 20 minutes of trying to sleep, leave the room and do something relaxing in dim light until you're sleepy.

*Exercise early in the day. Regular aerobic exercise promotes sleep, but evening workouts can impede it by raising body heat.

*Use natural light. It keeps your internal clock on a healthy schedule. Open shades to wake with the sun, and spend at least 30 minutes outside daily.